visit.Gemona

Troi dai Cincent
Ring walk of Mount Glemine

Unique rocks, breath-taking views and the Petri River

  • place start: Gemona, 270m – CAI 716
  • straighten length: 6Km
  • height altitude difference: 500m
  • schedule duration: 3h 00m
  1. The name Troi dai Cincent comes from the sum of 500 lira paid to the builders
  2. Among pine, hornbeam and hazel trees; don’t miss the blossoms of the St Lucie cherry trees in spring.
  3. Rio Petri and lithotypes, the unique rocks of the upper Carnia area around Troi dai Cincent
  4. The karst of Mount Glemine

Leaving the centre of Gemona through Porta Udine, proceed slightly downhill along the provincial highway in the direction of Artegna. As soon as you have passed through the tunnel for protection against falling rocks, below the rock wall of Glemine, leave the main road and walk a few metres along the road to Montenars. You will find a mule track on your left marked CAI 716, climbing the mountain slope.

The name Troi dai Cincent comes from the sum of 500 lira paid to the builders

The mule track, known locally as “Troi dai Cinccent”, was widened and straightened between the two world wars. The mountain slope was consolidated in 1956 by planting black pine and Scotch pine trees. The curious name of this path originated with the 500 lira daily pay of the workers who took part in the task.

Among pine, hornbeam and hazel trees; don’t miss the blossoms of the St Lucie cherry trees in spring.

The artificially planted black pine and Scotch pine have largely been naturally replaced with a thicket of heat-loving flowering ash and hornbeam, along with hazel and white beam trees and downy oak where the soil is deeper. Where the dynamism resulting from the ongoing addition of detritus from the slopes above due to freezing and thawing cycles and seismic events is greatest, this thicket thins out, and the species mentioned above are accompanied by St Lucie cherry trees, with their beautiful blossoms softening the look of this harsh environment in spring.

Rio Petri and lithotypes, the unique rocks of the upper Carnia area around Troi dai Cincent

Continuing along the steeply sloping path, we may observe shale and limestone gravel that appears very different from the rocks of the local outcrops. These lithotypes are found exclusively the upper Carnia area, deposited here by the Tagliamento glacier. After a couple of hairpin bends softening a steep ascent, we come up against a heap of detritus representing the summit of the moraine along the flank of the glacier, identifying its maximum height. At this point the mule track forks: take the right fork, along the route initially taken by the top of the moraine ridge (marked CAI 716).

Photo by Igor Cigliani

The karst of Mount Glemine

At the end of the Troi dai Cincent, continue left along a beautiful and panoramic path called the Troi di Miec (middle path). Along this stretch and up to the top of Mount Glemine, you can find numerous traces of karst. It is a phenomenon whereby water can dissolve rocks composed in abundance of calcium carbonate, or so-called limestone rocks. In addition to the numerous surface signs, such as grooves and corrosion pans, there are also hypogeal (or underground) karst phenomena in the area. The most famous is undoubtedly the source of the Rio Glemineit, an underground cavity that fills up in heavily rainy periods and creates a spectacular waterfall that flows near the Lavadôr di Godo.

Il Glemineit – Foto di Paolo Garofalo

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Itineraries

Cuarnan

What to see

Gemona Cathedral